Teaching Addition and Subtraction with Regrouping


Hey, y'all! We are loving math stations around here. Research has shown over and over how worksheets don't grow dendrites, and how educational games produce better understandings of concepts than drill and kill activities. This is why our math stations are so successful in our classroom.

I had a student say that these are "way harder" than the district curriculum used last year in her first grade classroom, but she like them "way more." :) Could it be because they get to move around and don't have to listen to me drone on and on during math time, and that they get to construct knowledge about different concepts? I think so. :) To see the original post about how math stations are structured, click here.


This math unit is set up so that students get practice in addition and subtraction with regrouping for two whole weeks before moving on to subtraction. I've found when students master this task first, the subtraction part becomes much easier. And you can always lengthen or condense these units depending on your students' needs.


The 3rd and 4th weeks cover subtraction with regrouping at length. If you're finding your students need to practice longer than the time designed for it, you can always leave the games out for students to practice with when they complete their other work.


Weeks 5 and 6 cover mixed practice addition and subtraction. The first week just uses the numbers and the second week focuses on word problems.


Each week includes lesson plans, station activities, whole group lessons, games, interactive notebook pages, and student direction cards. No more, "What are we supposed to do?" because it's right there on the instruction cards! (Can we say, "problem solvers?!")


The beautiful color by number page below is included in this unit as well, along with two other similar pages. But you can get a copy of these pages for free by clicking here.  


The whole unit is designed to last 6 weeks, but can be adjusted as needed. It's over 150 pages of resources to help you grow strong, independent mathematicians. To check out the whole unit, click here, and for more units like this, click here. Your students are going to love them!

Stay tuned for more seriously awesome resources coming your way soon and have a wonderful week!

Stay sweet,

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