Martin Luther King, Jr. Digital Resources

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Digital MLK, Jr. Day Unit

Hey, y'all. Are your students loving digital readers on Google Classroom™ as much as mine are? Sometimes it is so hard to fit in all the social studies, but these digital readers are an easy way to get it all in and allow students to work at their own pace. 

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With this MLK Day unit, students read a short passage and answer a writing prompt on each slide. They learn all about who Dr. King was, what the civil rights movement was and his part in it, and explore how they can continue to support his legacy. 

It's a short little unit just right for early finishers, reading stations, distance learning, or if you have a substitute. My kids love these digital readers and I know yours will, too. You can find out more about this unit and more in my TPT store here.  

I am always adding new resources so check back often for more new teaching tools. I hope you have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon.

Stay cozy, 


Digital February Math Centers for Primary Grades

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Digital Math Centers for Kindergarten, 1st Grade, and 2nd Grade

Hey, y'all! We're heading into the home stretch here soon, but before that, we get to have a little Valentine fun! 

This year, we're utilizing a ton of technology in the classroom in order to differentiate more easily with our students. That's one of the beauties of digital technology: students can be working on different levels of difficulty in each subject, but none of the other students know that they're all working on different things! Boom cards and Google Classroom have become the Holy Grail for differentiation! 

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Kindergarten students have fun comparing numbers, adding, counting, and finding the missing number. Each of these units is available for Boom Learning and Google Classroom.

First graders practice finding the missing subtrahend, adding 10 to a number, skip counting, and determine if a number is even or odd. With options available for Boom and for Google Classroom, your kids will have exactly what they need for math this month. 

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My second graders work on expanded form during this point of the school year, so there's plenty of practice in these units. They also work on skip counting, finding the missing subtrahend, and adding 2-digit numbers. The beauty of Boom cards are that they are self-checking and offer students immediate feedback. Google Classroom units allow you assign cards in chunks so students can work on all of the cards in one file or in smaller sections. 

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I am always adding new resources to my TPT store, so stop by often and check them out. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you found some new ideas for your classroom. Have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon. 

Stay cozy, 

Digital Winter Math and Reading Centers

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Digital Winter Math and Reading Centers

Hey, y'all. We're getting ready for the winter months around here and I love sharing the fun of the holiday season with my students!

This year, we're utilizing a ton of technology in the classroom in order to differentiate more easily with our students. That's one of the beauties of digital technology: students can be working on different levels of difficulty in each subject, but none of the other students know that they're all working on different things! Boom cards and Google Classroom have become the Holy Grail for differentiation! 

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What that looks like in the classroom is that one set of students are working on these Holiday Addition and Subtraction Boom Cards with numbers to 20 and another set of students are working on the same type of Boom Cards with numbers to 100. Each set of kiddos is getting exactly what they need, bu the kids don't have to know that their peers are working on an easier or harder set. They're all just working!

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And when it comes to sight word practice, the kids can all work on the same set of sight word Boom cards, or you could assign them the Google Classroom version and pick and choose which words you want different groups of students to practice. If little Jimmy still needs to practice spelling “I,” “and,” and “the,” he can, while little Suzy can work on words like “said,” “what,” and “play.” All you have to do as the teacher is separate the cards out (I usually do 5-10 words at a time so I don’t overwhelm my littles). 


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How easy is that?! Everyone gets what they need, you don’t have to make a ton of copies, and once you separate the sight word cards the way you want them, you can keep the sets like that assign them to students as they need them. 

 

I have to admit, I was super hesitant to go fully digital with my kiddos. I just wasn’t used to teaching things that way. (And I still think the kids need plenty of non-techy things to do!) But having digital options makes it SO EASY to plan and prepare for each of my groups of kiddos. What do you think? Are you loving this “digital revolution” we’re in right now or no? Let me know in the comments!

 

Have a wonderful week and stay tuned for more great resources coming soon!


Stay cozy,

Using Learning Plans for Digital Learning

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Using Learning Plans in the Digital Classroom

Hey, y'all! Are you looking for a plan for your virtual learners or your independent workers in your classroom? Are you needing a way to differentiate and give your students choice without having to create ten different activities? Learning plans may be your solution.

Learning plans are not necessarily a new thing, but they are a different way of thinking about old strategies. It's a way of taking a direct instruction lesson, an "I do/We do/You do" lesson, and menu choice boards and mesh them all together. 

The first part of a learning plan are the objectives, essential question(s), and learning progressions. If you're teaching emergent and beginning readers, you'll have to go over these things with your littles. If your students are old enough to read and understand things, you may only have to go over this part with them the first few times they see it. 

Even with older kids though, I still spend several weeks discussing what these things mean and what students need to do to monitor their learning. I've included pre-assessments in learning plans before to help my kids monitor their progress, but not all topics require it. 
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For this example, I stuck with a basic skill, but you could use anything from "identify the letters in the alphabet" to "explain the causes and consequences of the Civil War" or "develop a proof that [insert math strategy] is an effective way of solving these equations." They really are that versatile.

The next part of the learning plan is the learn about it section. This section can include videos, articles, links to websites,  lessons in your school's curriculum to do, or any other relevant activity that is delivering content to students. The point of this part is not to "assign" a specific lesson to students but to give students choice in how they are going to receive content. Students shouldn't *have* to complete all the things in this section but should be encouraged to maybe do a minimum of two items from this menu.

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After the students do the learn about it section, they move on to the practice it section. Again, this is more of a menu than a to-do list. Students can choose which games to play, activities to do, etc. This section isn't graded. It's more of the guided practice part of a lesson. 

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Finally, students show that they've learned the material by completing their evidence of learning. In this example, students have two choices, but like with any other menu, there could be multiple ways for students to demonstrate learning. 

In my Google Classroom, I post the choices as one assignment and in the directions, I remind students that they only have to complete one of the 2-3 tasks. Do I still have kids complete all of the choices? Yes. Not everyone follows directions, but you already know that. 

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So how do learning plans benefit students?
  • Students have choice in how they learn the material.
  • Students have choice in how they practice the material.
  • Students have choice in how they illustrate their understanding of concepts.
  • Students gain independence in their learning.
  • Students develop skills to help them self-monitor their learning (they can always go back to the learn about it section if they are struggling with the practice part).
  • Lessons can easily be differentiated for different skill levels. 

How do learning plans benefit teachers?
  • Again, they can be easily differentiated.
  • Providing students with choice increases engagement.
  • The responsibility for learning falls on the students--you become more of a facilitator of learning and the students have to do the hard work.
  • Provides a predictable structure for online learning. 

This concept of learning plans is not my original idea. However, it is one that can be easily used by any teacher at any grade level. 

In upper grades, I've seen learning plans on a Google Doc and students learn how to read through all the things to find what they need. In younger grades, I tend to break each part down into its own slide on Google Slides so the kids understand what they're looking at more easily. I've even added additional text boxes to show students which parts they should work through on each day so that they don't get overwhelmed and jump straight to the end.

Many students want to jump straight to the evidence of learning without doing any of the work to learn. In most cases, this is extremely evident. I tell my students, "Going straight to the evidence of learning without doing the learning about it section first is like opening a book and reading the last chapter. You have no idea what the whole story is when you do that." 

So yes, it takes training, just like everything else in the classroom. But when they finally get it, you can really do amazing things. 

I hope this helped you get your lessons organized a little better and if you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to share them. Have a wonderful day and I'll talk to you soon!

Stay cozy, 





Holidays Around the World

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Holidays Around the World

Hey, y'all! We're gearing up for our Holidays Around the World unit and I can't wait to share with you what it's going to look like this year. We've seen all the cutesy crafty things for this unit, but this year is going to look a little different. Because I won't be with my kiddos face to face, we're taking our unit digital! 

The beauty of this is that students get to complete things at their own pace and are free to explore resources online to gain that depth of knowledge we're always aiming for. 

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In this unit for use with Google Classroom™, students explore holidays like Kwanzaa, Hanukkah, Diwali, Chinese New Year, and Christmas in various parts of the world. Each page has an informational text, a comprehension question and/or a link to more information, and space for students to write their answers. 

There are also slides for students to compare and contrast different celebrations, as well as compare and contrast them to their own celebrations. This digital unit is great for second, third, or fourth grade and would be a great introductory unit for older grades as a springboard for writing a cultural research paper. 

You can find out more about this unit and other units for Google Classroom in my TPT store. Thanks for stopping by and stay tuned for more great resources coming soon.

Stay cozy,



Digital Multiplication Practice

digital-multiplication-practiceDigital Multiplication Practice

Hey, y'all. With the push to go digital, it has become easier than ever to differentiate for my students. When I would differentiate in the classroom with paper and pencil work, students always knew who got the more advanced or less advanced work. But with digital centers and activities, everyone gets what they need without anyone else knowing about it. 
digital-multiplication-practiceThese multiplication sets are broken up into four different sets: 0-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Students progress through each set and when they can show mastery of a set of facts, then I can easily push out a new set of cards for them to practice with. 
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What I love about Boom Cards is that they are self-checking and give students immediate feedback. Whenever they get an answer incorrect, Boom lets them know right away. And on the teacher side of the program, I can easily check which questions they missed and how they are progressing with each set. 

The kids love learning their multiplication facts and showing off how smart they are. I love that these cards are paperless, but could be printed if I wanted to. 

I hope you found some new ideas for your classroom. I'm always adding new resources to my Teachers Pay Teachers store so check back often for the latest and greatest. Have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon.

Stay sweet, 

Digital Winter Math Centers

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Digital Winter Math Centers

Hey, y'all. I don't know about your kiddos, but mine are loving these monthly digital math centers. I'm loving that I'm not hitting my copy limit or lugging papers home to grade. The digital aspect has been a game-changer in our classroom. 
digital-winter-math-centersKindergarten students practice simple subtraction, finding the missing addend with small numbers, number order to 20, and comparing numbers. Each of these centers are available as Boom Cards and for Google Classroom
digital-winter-math-centersFirst grade students practice similar skills like finding the missing addend, number order, and comparing numbers, but they use slightly bigger numbers. And instead of simple subtraction, firsties work on fact families. You can find the Boom version for first grade here and the Google Classroom version here
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Second graders have the same skill practices but with 3 digit numbers. And instead of fact family work, they practice writing numbers in expanded form. I love using these as Boom Cards because of the self-checking and instant feedback Boom gives students. If you're using Google Classroom instead, the cards are the same, but you have to check them on your own. 

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And if your second graders need some more practice adding and subtracting, these digital task cards are a great way to get in more practice. There are 36 cards in all: 12 addition with regrouping, 12 subtraction without regrouping, and 12 mixed practice without regrouping. The Boom cards version progresses through all 36 cards and is self-checking. The Google Classroom version is divided into 3 different sets so you can easily differentiate, but is not self checking.

I hope you found some new ideas for your classroom. I'm always adding new resources to my Teachers Pay Teachers store so check back often or follow me for the latest updates. Have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon. 

Stay sweet, 

December Digital Centers for Primary Grades

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December Digital Centers for Primary Grades

Hey, y'all. Can we just fast forward to Christmas? Cozy blankets, roaring fireplace, hot cocoa, gentle snowfall... No? Well at least we can start getting our digital December math centers ready. 

Digital centers make it super easy to keep the kids engaged, keep them socially distant, and save tons of paper. And who doesn't love to curl up with a blanket and work on math? ;)

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Each of these units is available for Boom Learning and for Google Classroom. The beauty of Boom is that it's self-checking and offers students immediate feedback. 

Kindergarteners work on simple addition, counting with ten frames and base ten blocks, and comparing numbers. You can find the Boom version here and the Google Classroom version here.

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First graders practice finding the missing addend, adding US coins (pennies, nickels, and dimes) and base ten blocks, and telling time to the hour and half hour. Second graders practice using expanded form, adding US coins (pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters), finding the missing addend, and telling time to five minutes. Each of these sets is "holiday" themed, without being too "elf" or "Santa." First grade sets can be found here and here, while second grade can be found here and here

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I've also taken the print version of the holiday addition and subtraction scoot game and made it digital for Boom Learning. Now, students can practice addition skills anywhere. Maybe you have one of those kiddos that needs a little extra time. (I mean, don't we all?) Give them the game digitally and then there's no need to rush. 

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There are two levels of play: numbers to 20 and numbers to 100. This makes it super easy to differentiate based on students needs and abilities. The self-checking feature and immediate feedback allows students to fix their mistakes and address any misunderstandings right away. So easy!

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I am always adding new resources to my TPT store, so stop by often and check them out. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you found some new ideas for your classroom. Have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon. 

Stay sweet, 

Digital Math Centers for October and November

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Digital Math Centers for October and November

Hey, y'all. Our digital math centers are in full swing around here and the kids are loving it! Fast forward to October and November and check out the units coming up. 

"Centers" in the traditional sense of the word are hard to come by when we have to socially distance ourselves from each other or we're teaching online classes. That's why the tech piece has been so beneficial. 

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October is one of my favorite months, even if it's one of the hardest months to teach it. (It's true. Research has proven it.) But that doesn't mean the kids can't have fun. With the October kindergarten math centers, students work on things like addition and subitizing, recognizing teen numbers, adding 1, and simple number order. These are offered both as Boom cards and for use with Google Classroom.

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First graders also work on number order, practicing finding the missing addend, 1 more/1 less, 10 more/10 less, and adding ten. The Boom cards are self checking, but a Google Classroom version is also available. 

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Second graders work on the same skills as first grade but with larger numbers. You can find the Boom version here and the Google Classroom version here. Each set has 38 cards with four different activities to practice with. 

Digital centers work well for at home learning, classroom centers, or in small group lessons. With the self-checking feature on Boom, you can quickly see how well students are performing on each activity and track their progress. 

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If your kiddos finish their centers quickly, there are Halloween centers that are perfect for October, too. The kids work on the same skills throughout the month but with a little holiday flair. 

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You can find the Halloween Boom card centers here and the Google Classroom versions here. The activities are almost identical across the platforms with only minor adjustments for the different platform limitations. 

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If your kindergarteners are still working on number order, these Boom card centers will help with their practice. The first set includes numbers to 20 and the second set includes numbers to 100. The beauty of digital centers is that it makes it so easy to differentiate based on students' needs. 

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Students simply click and drag the missing number to the pumpkin. These centers are self checking and give students immediate feedback. So simple but so effective!

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In November, kindergarteners practice simple addition, using ten frames to 20, counting, and using base ten blocks to 20. You can find them for Boom Learning and for Google Classroom.

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First graders practice time to the hour and half hour, comparing 2-digit numbers, base ten numbers, and 1 more/1 less, 10 more/10 less. Second graders compare 3-digit numbers, read numbers in expanded form and write them in standard form, tell time to five minutes, and solve word problems. First grade centers can be found here and here. Second grade's can be found here and here

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Whew, that was a lot. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you found some new math centers for your students. I am always adding new resources so stop by often to check out the latest. Have a wonderful week and I'll talk to you soon.

Stay sweet,